Oct 15, 2017

My mother, far left, with fellow Allison Hall residents as a senior at Southwestern College, Fall 1947.

Oct 8, 2017

Wed, Oct 8, 1947: buy them alive

"I'm so sleepy that my mind has slipped into a rut. The AmHist test is now prepared. Only constitution faces me. Making them out is fun; but I don't think that grading them will offe r much pleasure. How would you like to be my chief assistant paper-grader?  If we work together, maybe the time will go faster--and more pleasantly.
"The folks say that they can let us have some meet when butchering time comes; so perhaps I won't buy the half beef after all... It would be a lot more convenient for you to have some meet handy at all times. Even chicken is difficult to find here. Perhaps we could buy them alive."

--Letter from my father, Protection, Kans., to my mother, Winfield, Kans., Wednesday, October 8, 1947, evening.  Three typos in this typewritten letter per original.

Oct 5, 2017

Sun, Oct 5, 1947: a weekend guest

"It's one of the hottest days of the past month in Protection--Climate is powder-dry and the sand and dust infiltrate into tightly-closed houses.  You may have a job of housekeeping for this small apartment. When I'm here alone, I let it go.  Mrs. Sanders takes care of the dust film on Fridays....
"News item from yesterday's Protection Post: 'Miss Ruth Murray of Winfield was a weekend guest of Genevieve Jones, and visited with also friends, also.' [sic] I believe that the quote is correct in detail. So you didn't come to see me after all."

--Letter from my father, Protection, Kans., to my mother, Winfield, Kans., Sunday, October 5, 1947, evening.

Sep 29, 2017

Mon, Sep 29, 1947: so lonley

"The apt. doesn't seem so lonely--now that I have the memory of you in it--before the kitchen stove--apron-clad, at ease on the big living room divan, & across the table at meals. I'll always love you.
"DeVere."
--Letter from my father, Protection, Kans., to my mother, Winfield, Kans., Monday, September 29, 1947.

Sep 24, 2017

Wed, Sep 24, 1947: Dr. Chen

"Dr. Chen is the prize though.  I thought I would miss Saturday classes until I got your letter. So I approached him timidly and explained I would like to visit my fianceĆ© who is teaching in Western Kansas (that's you, sweetheart). He stammered in his usual manner. 'Yes, you can do some make-up-ah-later' And (leaning forward & lowering his tone) have a good time!' But now I'm going to be there. Shall I wait & see if he notices the difference?"

--Letter from my mother, Winfield, Kans., to my father, Protection, Kans., Wednesday, September 24, 1947.

Sep 23, 2017

Tue, Sep 23, 1947: Sunday School poll

"Your Sunday School poll was quite interesting. The results fitted the expected pattern for a church group--with an exception or two. Only 4 out of 43 felt that dancing is wrong. I daresay that a similar poll given thirty years ago would have brought very different answers. A change has occured in our relative morals. I'm pleased with the unanimous opinion on the one entitled: 'Marriage is as much a Christian vocation for a girl as any one directly engaged in humanitarian service."
--Letter from my father, Protection, Kans., to my mother, Winfield, Kans., Tuesday, September 23, 1947.

Sep 22, 2017

Mon, Sep 22, 1947: phonograph loudspeaker

"Your originality is refreshing! The letter today was the nicest that I have received from my fiancee in the last five months. There was only one drawback: When you talked to me through the phonograph loudspeaker I had the desire to say some things right back.  It was certainly good to hear your voice again."
--Letter from my father, Protection, Kans., to my mother, Winfield, Kans., Monday, September 22, 1947.

Sep 19, 2017

Fri, Sep 19, 1947: dark secrets

"And now I think it's really time I enlighten you.  When those men want to tell you all the dark secrets, you can just say you already know all about it, because here they are: Women with put-up hair aren't so attractive--but you've already seen me that way.  As Uncle Bill says, you may get leftovers on washday--but I'll try not to offend too greatly.  I've already explained that I'm not slender & graceful like the pictures of Petty girls. And you've seen me in my less sweet moods already.  So there's no more to worry about.  As for me, I can hardly wait.  Even reading a philosophy text reminds me of you!  And it was so much more fun to read it & pick out things to talk to you about."

--Letter from my mother, Winfield, Kans., to my father, Protection, Kans., Friday, September 19, 1947.

Sep 17, 2017

Wed, Sep 17, 1947: the band

"By a moment of indecision I got myself into a job tomorrow. I think that I'll like the job, except for one factor, the necessity for being at the schoolhouse at 4;30 a.m.  I plan to hit the bed immediately after supper, hence the letter now.  Here's hoping I won't suffer from temporary insomnia.  This afternoon King approached to say, "You want to go to Hutchinson with the band tomorrow, don't you?'. I replied I might like to.  Thinking it over, it occured to me that I could make better use of the day by sleeping late and taking up Ben Hicks on his offer of a trip to Ashland to get some fresh meat.  By that time, however, they had fixed me up as a sponsor of the bus.  Nearly all of the women teachers are going.  In this particular bus, however, are grouped most of the tough boys of the school.  Helman wants a man to handle them; otherwise he would have to redistribute them among th3e various buses.  Since it would entail a change in his plans I told him that I would do it.  It should be fun--but 4:30 comes very early in the morning."

--Letter from my father, Protection, Kans., to my mother, Winfield, Kans., Wednesday, September 17, 1947. Typos per original typewritten letter.

Sep 16, 2017

Tue, Sep 16, 1947: an unenlightened bride

"Tonight I am reading 'Mourning Becomes Electra,' on Mil's recommendation. It is a very interesting play, and very long--a trilogy.  I'm beginning to see some characteristics of his work now--such as violent emotions, unusual situations, and people utterly lacking in moral fibre.  I don't think it necessary to discuss on the stage the sexual adjustment of the characters, however--for that is the basis on which the woman murders her husband.  She must have been an unenlightened bride."

--Letter from my mother, Winfield, Kans., to my father, Protection, Kans., Tuesday, September 16, 1947.